Essays on World War 1

Free essays on World War 1 typically cover a wide range of topics related to the causes, events, and aftermath of the war. They often provide insights into the political, social, and economic factors that led to the outbreak of the war, as well as the military strategies and tactics employed by the various nations involved. These essays may also explore the impact of the war on society and culture, the role of women in the war effort, and the legacy of the conflict for future generations. Overall, free essays on World War 1 are a valuable resource for anyone interested in learning more about this pivotal moment in world history.
A Brief History of the Beginning and End of World War I
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World War One began on 28 July 1914 and ended 11 November 1918. Also known as the First World War, the war was fought by two opposing sides called the Allies and Triple Alliance. To name a few, on the Allies side were the Russian Empire, France, United Kingdom, and Italy while Germany and Austria-Hungary were on the Triple Alliance. The war began on the 28th of July in 1914 when the heir to the Austria-Hungary throne, Archduke Franz Ferdinand,…...
World War 1
Who Are the Nazi’s
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After World War I, Germany was in chaos. Germany had an uncertain future, with its poor economy, high unemployment rates, and an unstable political system. The aftermath of World War I left many army veterans frustrated with their losing the war. Some of these veterans joined a political organization, the German Workers’ Party, also known as DAP. One of these veterans was a man named Adolf Hitler. Originally, Hitler served in the German army, and his mission was spying on…...
World War 1
The Winding Chain of History
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The idea that history tends to repeat itself is a common belief held by many people in order to describe the nature of the past. Despite how humanity has evolved throughout the years, it seems people always turn back to the essence of the past. A notable example of this belief is the way people described World War 1 when it was waging, as the “war to end all wars.” Of course, the first world war would certainly not be…...
EuropePoliticsWorld War 1
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The Factors Of Yellow Journalism
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Was one of many factors that pushed Spain and the United States into war in Cuba. Yellow journalism is journalism that is based upon sensationalism and crude exaggeration. Yellow Journalism has been going on for more than a century it first started in 1898 when the New York press covered the sinking off the U.S.S. Maine in the Havana Port. “As time passed history was being made by an unscrupulous press, driven to sensationalize stories and fabricate facts in a…...
JournalismPoliticsWorld War 1
Security And Democracy Around The World
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Woodrow Wilson justifies his support for American involvement in world war 1 by stating that the U.S. are not joining the war to gain any selfish beneficial like the German government was, but for peace, safety, and democracy in the world. Wilson also justifies American involvement in the war by stating that the goal of the U.S. in this war is not for revenge, or for the U.S. to set a statement physically to other nations, but to protect the…...
MilitaryPoliticsWarWorld War 1
Unmasking the War With Forensics
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War is an outcome of multiple reasons starting from difference in ideology to the thirst and greed of being powerful. The world has witnessed multiple wars which caused massive destruction and loss of life. Be it the World War 1 or the Syrian Civil war, a thing common in them is that they are a reason of death of innocent individuals. One thing that becomes important here is to identify the dead as well as the cause henceforth with the…...
Civil WarWarWorld War 1
 the Escalating Long-Term Effects of Alsace-Lorraine on World War 1 
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There are many factors that can be used to argue about what lead to the outbreak of World War 1. Global imperialism, national alliances, and rivalry between countries can all be linked to one aspect, the region of Alsace-Lorraine and how it created a long-standing conflict between France and Germany. National and cultural identity in Alsace-Lorraine were oppressed by Germans that stirred a feud eventually leading to World War 1. The mid 1870th century was a time filled with colonial…...
GermanyImperialismWorld War 1
Medicine in World War I: Reaction, Evolution and Legacy
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World War I marked a turning point in the history of civilization, a point that forever changed the future and the promises held within it. Unimaginable weapons of chemical destruction were released on men ill-equipped for the horrors of modern warfare; millions lived weeks upon weeks in the mud of the trenches, only to be buried by the barrages of the artillery; airplanes brought warfare to never-before-seen heights, while submarines and dreadnoughts intensified the importance of naval supremacy. In the…...
HistoryLegacyWorld War 1
Nazi Propaganda’s Impact After WW1
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Socialism, commonly called Nazism, German political movement initiated in 1920 with the organization of the National Socialist German Workers' Party, also called the Nazi Party. The movement culminated in the establishment of the Third Reich, the totalitarian German state led by dictator Adolf Hitler from 1933 to 1945. National Socialism emerged from consequences of the German defeat in World War I (1914-1918). Under the terms of the Treaty of Versailles, Germany was charged with sole responsibility for the war, stripped…...
World War 1
The Reasons for the Occurrence of World War 1
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World War 1 and its Underlying Causes World War 1 was one ofthe most brutal and tragic wars in the early 1900s which caused a lot of pain and suffering for man. this war occurred in 1914-1918. This war was between European allies.. Both sides were fighting for land. This war had many reasons for occurrence. Militarism, Alliance Systems, and Nationalism were the main causes of World War 1. Militarism helps sides gain more weapons to guide soldiers in the…...
World War 1
An Overview of the Role of Women in the First World War
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World War I was known to be "The war to end all wars," and also labeled as "The Great War.” It began in 1914, and was fueled by militarism and nationalism throughout Europe. Tensions increased within countries due to strained alliances, and competition to usurp land from colonies was setting the scene for a great conflict that would change the course of history. A change that would not only be defined by boundary lines between countries, but also marked the…...
World War 1
An Analysis of Womens Lives After World War 1 in Britain and Germany
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Women's lives changed immeasurably both during and after World War 1 in Britain and Germany. Women's lives in Both Germany and Britain and Germany changed immensly during and after the course of World War 1. Women experienced huge economic, social and political changes, which became the foundation for change for generations of women to come. Because the majority of men were off fighting in the war, there was a large demand for workers in agriculture, factories, particularly munitions, and offices,…...
World War 1
An Analysis of Three Main Causes Leading Up to World War 1
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There were three main causes leading up to World War 1, but it wasn't until June 28, 1914 the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand triggered World War 1 which began on July 28, 1914. The main causes leading to World War 1 were: The Rise of Nationalism, Build-up of Military might, and system of military alliances. Europe avoided major wars in the 100 years before world War 1 began. In the 1800s, nationalism swept across the continent that help bring…...
World War 1
WW1’s Effect on Soldier’s Lives
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World War 1 not only changed the lives of soldiers physically, but mentally as well. Both on the battle field and in the trenches soldiers suffered from wounds, starvation and fatigue. Although history cannot hide the number of people who were killed and wounded, the mental effects of the war is more hidden. Both during and after the war soldiers suffered from nightmares, the constant memories of dying comrades and the feelings of not belonging anywhere. The soldiers lives were…...
World War 1
A Discussion on the Consequences of the World War 1 in Europe
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The aim of this of essay is to discuss the consequences of World War 1 in Europe, and using different types of evidence to prove whether the war was an entirely bad thing or not. The war left its marks on the people of Europe as well as on the land. The trenches in France and Belgium are an ugly sight, not to mention the devastation of the fighting areas all around. The worst thing, though, isn't anywhere to be…...
World War 1
Treaty of Versailles
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“Paris 1919, Six months that changed the world” , by Margaret MacMillan was an “Illuminating, engrossing, honest, and thoroughly engaging story. Macmillan provides generous amounts of background material and sometimes wide-ranging 'aftermaths' on given issues. She deals with most of Europe and much of Asia as well as Africa and North America occasionally, and addresses the full swing of events from the 1918 Armistice until the 1923 treaty of Lausanne. Between January and July 1919, after 'The War to End…...
Treaty Of VersaillesWorld War 2
The Senate And The Treaty Of Versailles
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Although Wilson had succeeded in creating the League of Nations and assembly many of the goals outlined in his Fourteen Points speech, his battles were no longer yet over. Indeed, at that factor they had barely begun. According to the Constitution, Wilson nevertheless had to persuade the required two-thirds of the Senate to ratify the Treaty of Versailles. If he failed to gather the quintessential sixty-seven votes, the peace that he had fought so ardently for would most probable die.…...
Treaty Of VersaillesWoodrow Wilson
League Of Nations
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Although Wilson had succeeded in creating the League of Nations and assembly many of the goals outlined in his Fourteen Points speech, his battles were no longer yet over. Indeed, at that factor they had barely begun. According to the Constitution, Wilson nevertheless had to persuade the required two-thirds of the Senate to ratify the Treaty of Versailles. If he failed to gather the quintessential sixty-seven votes, the peace that he had fought so ardently for would most probable die.Wilson's…...
Treaty Of VersaillesWoodrow Wilson
The Story Of Hitler
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The person I have decided to do my research project on is Adolf Hitler. I am doing a research interview on him for my report. Hitler had five siblings, a rough father and a supporting mother. Most of his siblings died after the age of 2. Hitler and his youngest sister were the only ones to endure to adulthood. Hitler was born and raised in Austria-Hungary. He was born on April 20, 1889 and committed suicide on April 30, 1945.…...
Adolf HitlerTreaty Of VersaillesWorld War 2
Battle Of The Somme Movie
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This essay sample on Battle Of The Somme Movie provides all necessary basic info on this matter, including the most common "for and against" arguments. Below are the introduction, body and conclusion parts of this essay.During World War I the government and army officials constantly endeavoured to project a positive image of the war effort and any attempt to show negative aspects of the war were discouraged as it was felt that this would ‘lower morale’ and discourage patriotism and…...
World War 1
Was Conscription Necessary In Ww1
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The sample paper on Was Conscription Necessary In Ww1 familiarizes the reader with the topic-related facts, theories and approaches. Scroll down to read the entire paper.A. Plan of Investigation Was Canadian conscription in World War I justified? Many people have addressed the issue of Canadian conscription in World War I and debated back and forth as to the justification and necessity of it at the time. The purpose of this internal assessment is to determine whether instituting conscription was a…...
World War 1
How Did Imperialism Cause World War 1
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The essay sample on How Did Imperialism Cause World War 1 dwells on its problems, providing shortened but comprehensive overview of basic facts and arguments related to it. To read the essay, scroll down.Historians are still today debating on what actually caused World War One. This is because the actual origin was a combination of many different factors. Short-term as well as long-term causes influenced the outfall of events, however some are more important than others. What is mainly agreed…...
HistoryImperialismMedieval EuropeWarWorld War 1
R.C.Sherriff: Memories of Life in the Trenches
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The following academic paper highlights the up-to-date issues and questions of Rc Sherriff. This sample provides just some ideas on how this topic can be analyzed and discussed. The First World War was a time of trauma and devastation. Many lives were lost, and in his play, ‘Journey’s End’, R.C.Sherriff tries to effectively portray the havoc that World War I wreaked. Robert Cedric Sherriff was born in 1896 and was educated at Kingston Grammar School primarily, until he moved to…...
World War 1
Progressives Launched The Social Purity Movement To
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The sample paper on  familiarizes the reader with the topic-related facts, theories and approaches. Scroll down to read the entire paper. Lesson 8 By 1900s the meaning of American identity at home excluded more people than previously Progressive reformers were primarily concerned with making democratic capitalism work better American women of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries found that the settlement house movement was a good place to use their talents to help society Progressives launched the social purity…...
World War 1
To What Extent Essay
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The essay sample on To What Extent Essay dwells on its problems, providing a shortened but comprehensive overview of basic facts and arguments related to it. To read the essay, scroll down.To what extent was the League of Nations a success? In 1914 war broke out in Europe. The war ended in 1918 and Germany solely blamed. The end of the war was signed with the treaty of Versailles. From the war was born the League of Nations; who helped…...
GovernmentInternational RelationsLeague Of NationsPoliticsTreaty Of Versailles
Small Rootless International Clique
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The sample essay on Small Rootless International Clique deals with a framework of research-based facts, approaches, and arguments concerning this theme. To see the essay's introduction, body paragraphs and conclusion, read on.Rise of a Tyrant, Hitler and the Holocaust BY oliver2017284 Rise of the Tyrant, Hitler and the Holocaust Germany was in utter chaos due to hyperinflation, Joblessness, and humiliation prompted by the Treaty of Versailles leading to a demoralized and dire state. During this crisis, Adolf Hitler, an unknown…...
Adolf HitlerGermanyNazi GermanyPoliticsThe HolocaustTreaty Of Versailles
Essay Sample on Balfours Norman
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  The 1906 election was a major turning point in the political climate of Edwardian Britain. The loss of this election heralded a period of Conservative decline and Liberal ascendancy. Many historians blame Arthur Balfour, nephew to Lord Salisbury, for the landslide loss for the Conservatives in the 1906 general election. Whether it was the policies he implemented, the political machinations of the Liberals and the newly formed Labour Party or simply a demand for a change in political policy,…...
World War 1
Treaty Of Versailles Pros And Cons
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PRO’S and CON’s For starters, the Paris Peace Treaty that ended WWI causing subjecting Germany to ruinous financial penalties and limited what they could do in the way of rearming themselves to, say, protect themselves from Russia. The outcome of this treaty started the settlement which elaborated in the peace treaties included payment of war reparations, commitment to minority rights and territorial adjustments including the end of the Italian Colonial Empire in Africa. The treaties allowed Italy, Romania, Hungary, Bulgaria,…...
World War 1
Pros And Cons Of Nationalism
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Nationalism is a popular sentiment that places the existence and well-being of the nation highest in the scale of political loyalties. In political terms, it signifies a person’s willingness to work for the nation against foreign domination, whether political, economic, or cultural. Nationalism also implies a group’s consciousness of shared history, language, race, and values. Its significance lies in its role in supplying the ties that make the nation-state a cohesive viable entity. Nationalism belongs to the modern world. Before…...
World War 1
American History: Resolving Problems Between Citizens
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America History from my understanding can be understood as a summary of all the events that happened and contributed in the past to make a better tomorrow for our continent, country or society. One of the memorable moments in U.S history from my perspective is the declaration of independence, which is one of the most important documents in the history of the U.S declaring independence from Great Britain. Another event is the Zimmerman telegram which was the main cause why…...
World War 1
Essay Examples on Battle of the Somme
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The following sample essay on The Battle of the Somme lasted from July 1916 to November 1916. It was easily one of the worst battles ever fought. This battle took place at the Somme River,which runs through Europe. The opposing armies fought in a line of trenches over 960 Kilometers long. The trenches stretched from the Belgian Coast to the Frontiers of Switzerland. Although trench warfare was looked highly upon both sides still relied on heavy infantry attacks. Many men…...
World War 1
Vera Deakin’s Participation in the First World War
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The following sample essay on Vera Deakin’s Participation in the First World War tells the story of Vera Deakin's historical contribution to the First World War. Vera Deakin had a massive part in World War 1 as she was the driving force of the wounded and missing Inquiry Bureau. The aim of the bureau was to provide information to the families of Australian soldier’s, to notify them if their sons were missing, wounded or dead. This bureau was SO important…...
CommunicationWarWorld War 1
World War Ii Dbq
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World War II DBQ After the deaths of 37,508,686 soldiers by the end of World War I, Europe was a mess. Countries had been dissolved and rearranged, governments had fallen and been replaced, and economies were thriving then crashing, all as a result from World War I. One of the main goals at the end of World War I was to prevent another tragedy like World War I from happening again. Clearly that did not happen, as World War II…...
World War 1
Why Did A Stalemate Develop On The Western Front
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World war: How the Stalemate was developed In this piece of work I will be exploring the events between the start of the world war and Christmas 1914 and I’ll be looking on how the stalemate developed. With the Schlieffen plan a wash at the onset of the war and the resulting “race to the sea” leaving the opposing sides on an unending series of trench-building marathons until they were lined up from the Alps in the south to the…...
World War 1
Soldiers During the First World War
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The following sample essay on Soldiers during the First World War may have felt that their Generals and Commanders just ordered them around and never helped in the actual fighting and the battles of the First World War. They may have felt angry and frustrated because of this. However the General's job was to teach and order soldiers how to fight and why to fight for their country, and not to go to war and have the possibility of dieing.…...
World War 1
Why Was the Treaty of Versailles so Unpopular in Germany?
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Why was the Treaty of Versailles so unpopular in Germany? The Treaty of Versailles was the peace treaty that was drawn up by the Allies and Germany after the First World War. It was made to prevent Germany from starting a war again and to pay back the Allies for the money they had spent. The Germans had hoped that the Allies would treat them fairly in the negotiations for the treaty, but the Allies, in particular France, believed that…...
GermanyInternational RelationsMilitaryPoliticsTreaty Of Versailles
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FAQ about World War 1

Who Are the Nazi’s
...In conclusion, the Nazis were members of the Nationalist Socialist German Workers’ Party. The members of this party were anti-Semitism and believed that Jews were imperfect human beings. The Nazis were the one that dragged the Jews and others to th...
How Did Imperialism Cause World War 1
...In some ways it makes sense considering that Austro-Hungarian Empire consequently came to an end, and many other changes could be seen on the European map after the Great War. Germany was forced down to her knees and lost much territory to France and...
To What Extent Essay
...The failures of the league do outweigh the successes. The league did fail in co-operation and working in unity. The major member states were to blame mainly due to their selfish decisions and disagreements against the league. The league was a success...
Why Did A Stalemate Develop On The Western Front
...But if Belgium just let Germany thorough there country then Germany could have captured Paris quickly enough and kicked them out of the war and the war may have been finished by Christmas. But one different move may have changed the whole history of ...
Why Was the Treaty of Versailles so Unpopular in Germany?
...This seemed unfair to the Germans, because everywhere else in Europe, the Treaties of 1919–20 gave peoples self-determination, but they divided Germany, and put 12. 5% of its population into other countries. The army believed that the government ha...
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