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Poetry of William Blake (all questions!)

Where in the poem does the speaker wonder if the tiger may have been created by God? What imagery tells us that the tiger could also be a demonic creation?
Right at the middle the speaker wonders if the tiger was created by God. There is a lot of imagery that tells us the tiger could be a demonic creation.

What imagery suggests that the tiger could be a force of enlightenment and of revolutionary violence?
The image of the tiger “burning bright” suggests both enlightenment and revolutionary violence.

Paraphrase the following lines from “The Tyger.”
What immortal hand or eye, / Could frame thy fearful symmetry?
What person could fully understand the immensity of your power?

How does The Tyger represent people’s simultaneous attraction toward and repulsion from evil?
William Blake”s “The Tyger” is a poetic metaphor or allegory using the symbol of the tiger, mythological allusions, and images of Creation, Heaven, and Hell to make a point about the nature of good and evil. One reason for the poem’s immortality is its exciting, unusual, and evocative imagery and another reason is its universal and timeless theme.

For Blake the symbolic opposite of the tiger is —
A

A central image of “The Tyger” is
A

The symmetry of “The Tyger” is enhanced by the —
C

The speaker in “The Tyger” is
D

In the poem the tiger is compared to __________.
B

In “The Tyger,” what is offered as contrast to the tiger?
C

In the fourth stanza of “The Tyger,” the creation of the tiger is associated with
C

In Blake’s poem “The Tyger,” “the forests of the night” most clearly suggest the
B

The speaker’s attitude toward the tiger can best be described as —
B

The phrase “fearful symmetry” in the “The Tyger” describes
C

In “The Tyger” the stars probably symbolize —
B

The imagery used in “The Tyger” suggests that the tiger could be
A

What does the creator do for his creation in the first stanza of the “The Lamb”?
He gives the lamb life, food, clothing and a gentle voice.

Which word describes the mood of the illustration accompanying the poem “The Lamb”? Explain why the answer you selected is correct.
b, Explanation: “Serene” is the best word to describe the illustration because it depicts a setting in what looks like a quiet countryside with a child calmly feeding a lamb.

What emotions does Blake’s description of the lamb evoke in you? Explain why.
That this little lamb is a firm believer in his creator, God.
*Answers will vary
**this is the answer I wrote down and it was correct!

What idea does the lamb symbolize in Blake’s poem “The Lamb”? Explain your answer, citing a detail from the poem.
b, Explanation: In “The Lamb” the Lamb is also the name that Blake gives the child in the lines, “He is called by thy name, / For he calls himself a Lamb: / He is meek & he is mild, / He became a little child …” The child is also a symbol of innocence.

Where in the second stanza does Blake make explicit the Christian symbolism of his poem?
Jesus is referred to as a lamb in the Bible. The stanza reflects the language of Christian values: gentleness, meekness, peace. The stanza also begins to capitalize “He,” which is standard when referring to Jesus or the Christian God.
*Answers will vary

A central idea of “The Lamb” is the
D

The speaker in “The Lamb” describes Christ as a —
D

What type of poetry is “The Lamb”?
B

Whom does Blake refer to as “He” in “The Lamb”?
A

In “The Lamb,” the speaker’s attitude toward the lamb could best be described as
B

Which word best describes the mood of the above illustration accompanying “The Lamb”?
D

The tone of “The Lamb” is
A

According to the speaker, the lamb is endowed with the qualities of —
A

In the poem “The Lamb,” the lamb is used to symbolize what religious figure?
A

Which is an abstract idea symbolized by the lamb in Blake’s poem “The Lamb”?
C

Lines 1-8 of “The World Is Too Much with Us” express the speaker’s
B

All of the following lines from “I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud” contain images suggesting light except for
B

In “The World Is Too Much with Us,” people are “out of tune” with
B

In “The World Is Too Much with Us,” what accounts for people’s being “out of tune”?
C

Two kinds of images predominate in “I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud”: images suggesting movement and those suggesting light. Identify some of each type of image. What is their effect upon the mood of the poem?
The following lines contain images suggesting movement: a. “I wandered lonely as a cloud / That floats on high o’er vales and hills,” b. “A host, of golden daffodils; / . . . / Fluttering and dancing in the breeze.” c. “Tossing their heads in sprightly dance.” d. “The waves beside them danced; . . .” e. “And then my heart with pleasure fills, / And dances with the daffodils.” The following lines contain light a. “Continuous as the stars that shine / And twinkle on the milky way,” b. ” . . . but they / Outdid the sparkling waves in glee;” c. “They flash upon that inward eye” Students’ answers should reflect the understanding that the movement and light imagery help to create a mood of a. lightheartedness. b. optimism. c. gentle bliss.
*Answers will vary

Identify two figures of speech from the poem, and analyze how they contribute to the poem’s tone, emotion, and meaning.
A sample response follows: The sea baring its bosom to the moon in line 5 gives the poem an ecstatic, romantic feeling and contributes to a tone of lyrical rapture. This figure of speech expresses what the speaker longs for, what he feels modern life has given up. He says that people see little that is theirs in nature, but evidently he sees nature and sees it beautifully as in the comparison of the wind to sleeping flowers in lines 6-7. This figure of speech builds on previous ones and creates a mental picture of a seascape at night, with the speaker viewing it “on this pleasant lea.” The speaker both admires the scene and wishes he could be more completely swept up by it. Soon after these wonderful images, the poet adds, “It moves us not,” which seems contradictory and turns the tone bitter. This underscores the complexity of his response.

In “I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud,” the speaker views being alone as
A

The imagery in “I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud” appeals mainly to the sense of
A

The speaker of “The World Is Too Much with Us” believes that if he were a pagan, he would be
D

Poets generally use allusion to __________.
C

Select the one most correct answer from the choices given.
D.) their over-involvement with economic aspects of life

The speaker compares the winds to —
C

Wordsworth uses allusions to emphasize the speaker’s connection to —
A

In “The World Is Too Much with Us,” people are “out of tune” with

Select the one most correct answer from the choices given.

Nature

In line 4, the speaker says, “We have given our hearts away.” What is he referring to?
D

“The world is too much with us” means that —
D

In “The World Is Too Much With Us,” the speaker believes that —
A

The allusions in “The World Is Too Much with Us” refer to —
B

Which of the following sentences might be a paraphrase of the statement “Little we see in Nature that is ours”?
A

Identify the central theme of “The Rime of the Ancient Mariner.” Briefly explain why you chose your answer.
c, Explanation: Students should note that the sanctity of all wild creatures is stressed by the importance of the change in the Mariner—the Albatross falls from his neck when he sees the importance in the natural world, and can feel empathy and love for other living creatures.

What is the reaction of the mariner’s shipmates when he kills the albatross? Why?
The shipmates are angry with the mariner. They had thought the bird was a good omen.

Who is aboard the ghost ship?
A woman called Nightmare Death-in-Life, and a man called Death are on board.

How does the weather change after the mariner kills the albatross?
There is no wind and only intense heat.

What has the Mariner learned from his experience? What is the moral of the poem? Use details from the poem to support your answers.
a. The moral of the poem concerns universal love-the importance of having respect and reverence for all things that God has created. b. The killing of the Albatross was a great evil and it is not until the Mariner comes to see “God’s beauty” in even the most hideous creatures (the snakes) that he is forgiven. c. There are universal laws controlling our behavior toward others and there are grave penalties for breaking them.
*Answers will vary

The actual geographical journey taken by the Mariner in “The Rime of the Ancient Mariner” is obvious. It might be noted, however, that Coleridge is more interested in another “journey” his narrator takes. Write an essay examining the emotional and spiritual journey of the Mariner. Cite passages from the poem that illustrate this journey.
The Mariner also takes a spiritual journey in the poem. Students’ essays should cite passages which illustrate the emotional changes in the Mariner, and analyze the ways he comes to be the sagelike figure that can tell his tale to the Wedding Guest.

Identify some of the qualities the Albatross symbolizes. Cite details from “The Rime of the Ancient Mariner” to support your interpretation.
Simple Answer!
Luck, nature, and guilt are some of the qualities that students may say the Albatross symbolizes.

Which of the following pairs of poetic sound devices does Coleridge employ in the line, “The western wave was all aflame,” from “The Rime of the Ancient Mariner”? Briefly explain your answer choice, defining the literary terms.
b, Explanation: “western” and “wave” begin with the same consonant and are therefore examples of alliteration; “wave” and “aflame” contain the same vowel sound (but dissimilar consonant sounds) and are therefore examples of assonance.

What penance must the mariner constantly pay for killing the albatross?
He must travel from country to country telling his tale.

Who is the ancient mariner talking to at the beginning of the poem?
A wedding guest

The redemption of the Mariner occurs when he
D

Ballads began as oral tradition, meaning that _________.
A

The dice game between Death and Life-in-Death in “The Rime of the Ancient Mariner” suggests that
C

Why does the Mariner tell his story?
C

In which line from “The Rime of the Ancient Mariner” are alliteration and variations on the o sound most evident, creating a heavy, grim tone?
D

Whom does the Mariner tell his tale to in “The Rime of the Ancient Mariner,” and where is he when he tells it?
C

What happens to the Mariner whenever he tells his tale?
B

The crew finally views the bird’s death as the cause of a —
C

Which line from “The Rime of the Ancient Mariner” contains alliteration, consonance, and internal rhyme?
C

The men’s gazes, which rest upon the Mariner even after they die, symbolize —
D

Why does the Mariner tell his story?
C

All of the following is part of the speaker’s attitude toward the pleasure-dome except
D

Which of the following instruments’ music probably sounds most similar to the dulcimer played by the damsel in “Kubla Khan”? Briefly explain your answer.
a, Explanation: the harp is a stringed instrument, like the dulcimer; although a snare drum is played with sticks, similar to the dulcimer, it does not make a melody.

Choose one of the statements below, and on a separate sheet of paper, analyze how the poem’s words, sounds, and images helped evoke that response in you.
A sample response follows:a.Xanadu is it! A sacred river, caves of ice, fertile gardens, cedar groves in mysterious haunted caverns—and all of it described in the most musical, alliterative and assonant language. I want to go there immediately, at least every few months. To be sure, there are images of dread and savagery in the poem, but these are what Coleridge calls “holy dread”; the awe and mystery that come with sacred magic, with moonlit women wailing for their demon lovers, and damsels playing on dulcimers. Hey, it doesn’t get any better than this! b.Xanadu sounds like a really awful place. It is icy and sunless, as the speaker makes all too clear in his description of the underground river, the caves of ice, and the sunless sea. It must be quite cold if these details are reliable. On moonlit nights the locale is downright dangerous—one wouldn’t be surprised if, in response to that deranged woman wailing for her demon lover in lines 15-16, nothing less than a werewolf should show up. The damsel with the dulcimer may temporarily fulfill a fantasy of the speaker’s, but is she herself fulfilled, or is she one of the countless abused female “entertainers,” including geishas and belly dancers, to be found amid the detritus of world culture? In the midst of it all, ancestral voices are heard prophesying war—a grim prospect of future ruin if there ever was one. Take me back to Wisconsin Rapids! c.(Accept any response adequately supported by details from the poem and having a bearing on the selection standards, for example, imagery, figures of speech, sounds, and mood.)

The closing lines of “Kubla Khan” add another dimension to the poem’s meaning because they ____. Explain your answer.
b, Explanation: “I would build that dome in air.” The poem’s last lines shift the focus to the poet as the inspired creator.

In “Kubla Khan,” Coleridge explores a fascination with exotic places and things. Write an essay analyzing his view and portrayal of Xanadu as an exotic place. Why do you think Coleridge is attracted to the exotic?
Students should describe the elements of fantasy that Coleridge ascribes to Xanadu, pointing to such details as the spirit of the “woman wailing for her demon lover” and the vision of the Abyssinian maid “singing of Mount Abora.” Students may also point out that a love of the exotic is naturally suited to the Romantic temperament, which revels in the mystery of the unknown and all that lies outside the realm of everyday experience.

The speaker believes that, if he could “revive” within him the Abyssinian maid’s song, he would be capable of
D

The final image of “Kubla Khan” is that of the
C

In “Kubla Khan,” Coleridge uses alliteration to create —
C

The pleasure-dome encloses which of the following?
B

The speaker in “Kubla Khan” describes a
C

The speaker’s vision suddenly changes with the image of the —
D

What is unusual about the sacred river Alph?
B

Which sentence states an important theme of “Kubla Khan”?
A

In the stanza beginning on line 12, the speaker describes the pleasure-dome as —
A

The overall mood of the poem could not be described as —
C

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