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Lord Of The Flies Paper

I will now talk about the opening of Harry Hooks second screen adaptation of William Golding’s cult novel about a group of British school children that revert to savagery when marooned on a deserted island. The new adaptation replaces British school children with a group of American military cadets. Harry Hook is also a very effective professional film director who employs a wide range of camera techniques. At the start of Harry Hook’s version of Lord Of The Flies we see a blank screen for about 10 seconds, we also hear very strange electronic music, which gives a strange intriguing effect.

This also gives the audience no idea about what is going on this is very similar to Peter Brooks first shot in his screen adaptation of Lord Of The Flies only Brook has a bell in the background. We see the foot descending. When we see the foot it gives a shocking effect, but as we then see the full male body descending it seems quite peaceful. While we see this there is no noise at all. This is also very similar to Peter Brooks’s version of The Lord Of The Flies because I think Brook uses Cricket and people clapping politely to represent peace, Harry Hook decides to use the silence to represent peace.

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When we see the man slowly sinking past the camera we see he is wearing a pilot’s uniform. The audience can infer that this man is a pilot. The audience can also deduce that we are in the sea or underwater. We then see bubbles rising from his mouth we can now infer that he is drowning; we then see a blue screen this is confusing the audience are trying to guess what is happening. The camera then cuts to a shot of boys above the water, the water is splashing against the camera and making the camera move so we can not see exactly what is going on, we hear loud screaming there is a sense of panic and worry.

Harry Hook has used the camera in a first person point of view so it seems like we are actually seeing the view that one of the boys would see. We then see an underwater shot looking upwards we see flailing legs and hear muffled shouting. I like this camera technique because it creates a sense of confusion and disorientation. This camera technique was used a lot in the film Jaws it created a sense of panic and distress because when ever we seen an underwater shot in Jaws we knew something bad was going to happen just like when we hear the drum in Peter Brooks version of The Lord Of The Flies we know something bad is going to happen.

The camera then rotates 360 degrees looking upwards from under the water. This shows the vulnerability of the survivors. We then see another underwater shot of a boy swimming down again. The audience is confused wondering what is he after? Then see a mid shot of a life raft then exploding open this startles the audience and explains how they survive and also what the boy was so desperate to retrieve from the water. In the next shot we see the title credits “Lord Of The Flies” on a silver and black background.

And just like the Peter Brook version the letters stand out from the black background. We hear jaunty music drums, violins and flutes it has a very Irish jig feel to it, which in my opinion creates a sense of adventure and excitement. The next shot we see an extreme long shot of the island where their destination is. The raft floats onto the screen from a distance showing the survivors, who there are about twenty children and one pilot, unconscious. The boys wade ashore to where their journey begins.

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Lord Of The Flies. (2017, Jul 09). Retrieved from https://paperap.com/paper-on-lord-of-the-flies/

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