Ignorance is bliss

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Ignorance is certainly bliss. Oedipus had been living a lie his whole life. He was raised by people who weren’t even his real parents and didn’t know of his origins. Maybe that was a good thing. When Oedipus invites Treaties over to talk about Alias’ death, Treaties refuses to tell Oedipus anything. Treaties then says “This day will give you a father, and break your heart. ” (Sophocles, Peg. 24) Because Oedipus doesn’t know anything about his true family, he curses at Treaties. Oedipus sends Treaties away in a fit of rage.

Why won’t Treaties tell me anything? The less Oedipus knows the better. Oedipus soon finds out the information needed to continue with the curse he put on the man who murdered King Alias. When Oedipus realized that he may have committed the very crime he is trying to solve, he says “l think that I myself may be accurate by my own ignorant edict. ” (Peg. 40) Here, he even finds himself ignorant. Oedipus was unknowing of many things prior to this discovery; one which was who did it. Who killed Alias? When he found out it was himself it all fell into place.

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Oedipus killed his father and was sleeping with/had children with his mother. Ignorance was the only way for him. Ignorance was the best way. “It was said that the boy would kill his own father,” said the Shepherd. (Peg. 64) Here was where Oedipus knew that he was the killer of his own father and that the prophecy had come true. If Oedipus had not known about the prophecy, this would’ve never happened. He would’ve never left Corinth. He would’ve never kill King Alias. He would’ve never gone to Thebes and taken over as king.

This whole book was based off f knowing too much and that is why ignorance, for Oedipus, would’ve been bliss. Ignorance is certainly bliss. When you said in class that we, as students, were in this book, didn’t want to believe it. But too was ignorant. And it was bliss; at least at first. I didn’t know what this book had to offer and how it relates to my life and the lives around me. It shows me that we all are Oedipus in some way. Some are leaders. Some are full of questions. And some, like me, are ignorant Though ignorance is bliss, so is knowledge. And having a little bit Of both is better.