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Scrooge’s Conversion Essay

Words: 1843, Paragraphs: 52, Pages: 7

Paper type: Essay

In Charles Dickens’ “A Christmas Carol,” the main character was given an interesting glow, not like the ordinary protagonist or main character of a story. Ebenezer Scrooge’s character wasn’t even that of a protagonist. He has a grumpy attitude and a bad temper to top that. He doesn’t trust anyone, even his worker, that’s why he treats them cruelly and indifferently. Because of that, his workers also despise him, and talks badly about him behind his back. The only one who seems to have a little faith in him was his nephew. But despite Scrooge’s personality, he was still given the chance to redeem himself with the help of different specters – spirits who all wanted to help him change his ways for good. And their efforts were not left futile, for Scrooge has slowly changed his outlook in life. This was the conversion of Ebenezer Scrooge.

Proofs of Scrooge’s conversion (For internal quotations – from the book/article)

“(Then, with a rapidity of transition very foreign to his usual character, he said, in pity for his former self, “Poor boy!” and cried again.

“I wish,” Scrooge muttered, putting his hand in his pocket, and looking about him, after drying his eyes with his cuff: “but it’s too late now.”

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“What is the matter?” asked the Spirit.

“Nothing,” said Scrooge. “Nothing. There was a boy singing a Christmas Carol at my door last night. I should like to have given him something: that’s all.”)”

(Dickens)

*This part is found in the second stave of the site I gave you which is http://www.stormfax.com/2dickens.htm Just find the part, by using the find tool, by pressing CTRL+F then typing the words you want to find in the article like the first four words of this quote, which is [Then, with a rapidity]

 

This was one of the proofs that Scrooge was slowly softening, when the Ghost of the past showed him his past life. He grew soft seeing sad memories, which is why he felt pity to the boy who sang a Christmas Carol in his doorstep. This is but a proof that inside Ebenezer Scrooge was a soft caring person.

“(“Spirit,” said Scrooge, with an interest he had never felt before, “tell me if Tiny Tim will live.”

“I see a vacant seat,” replied the Ghost, “in the poor chimney-corner, and a crutch without an owner, carefully preserved. If these shadows remain unaltered by the Future, the child will die.”

“No, no,” said Scrooge. “Oh, no, kind Spirit. Say he will be spared.”

“If these shadows remain unaltered by the Future, none other of my race,” returned the Ghost, “will find him here. What then? If he be like to die, he had better do it, and decrease the surplus population.”

Scrooge hung his head to hear his own words quoted by the Spirit, and was overcome with penitence and grief.

“Man,” said the Ghost, “if man you be in heart, not adamant, forbear that wicked cant until you have discovered What the surplus is, and Where it is. Will you decide what men shall live, what men shall die? It may be, that in the sight of Heaven, you are more worthless and less fit to live than millions like this poor man’s child. Oh God! To hear the Insect on the leaf pronouncing on the too much life among his hungry brothers in the dust.”

Scrooge bent before the Ghost’s rebuke, and trembling cast his eyes upon the ground. But he raised them speedily, on hearing his own name.)”

(Dickens)

*This part is found in the third stave of the site I gave you which is http://www.stormfax.com/3dickens.htm Just find the part, by using the find tool, by pressing CTRL+F then typing the words you want to find in the article

This is another proof of Scrooge slowly converting, when he showed concern about the child of his servant, wherein he was somewhat responsible in making their lives miserable. He was concerned about the child and even pleaded to the specter so that the child will not die. When the specter foretold his death, he was pleading to remake what he has foreseen in order to spare the life of the child. Scrooge was guilty with his actions since it was his fault that the family is poor, or he thinks that his actions made it that way. Because of the guilt he was feeling, he was slowly changing into a better person, someone who is sympathetic and is concerned about other people’s welfare.

“(The Ghost was greatly pleased to find him in this mood, and looked upon him with such favour, that he begged like a boy to be allowed to stay until the guests departed. But this the Spirit said could not be done.

“Here’s a new game,” said Scrooge. “One half hour, Spirit, only one.”)”

(Dickens)

*This part is found in the third stave of the site I gave you which is http://www.stormfax.com/3dickens.htm Just find the part, by using the find tool, by pressing CTRL+F then typing the words you want to find in the article

 

When Ebenezer Scrooge went to his nephew’s place he was enjoying himself watching the games they are playing, in their celebration of Christmas. Ebenezer Scrooge, a man known to be devoid of any social gatherings was enjoying a party, a gathering for the first time. This means that he likes it that way, a proof of his conversion into a good heart.

 

“(“Ghost of the Future!” he exclaimed, “I fear you more than any spectre I have seen. But as I know your purpose is to do me good, and as I hope to live to be another man from what I was, I am prepared to bear you company, and do it with a thankful heart. Will you not speak to me?”)”

(Dickens)

 

*This part is found in the fourth stave of the site I gave you which is http://www.stormfax.com/4dickens.htm Just find the part, by using the find tool, by pressing CTRL+F then typing the words you want to find in the article

This statement of Scrooge was a proof that he was willing to be led to the right path. He addressed the non-speaking specter, even though he fears him the most because he brings forth the message of the future. He was willing to have a conversation in order to know more, maybe so, that he was willing to change his ways and become a better person than what he is before.

 

“(“Spirit,” said Scrooge, shuddering from head to foot. “I see, I see. The case of this unhappy man might be my own. My life tends that way, now. Merciful Heaven, what is this?”)”

(Dickens)

*This part is found in the fourth stave of the site I gave you which is http://www.stormfax.com/4dickens.htm Just find the part, by using the find tool, by pressing CTRL+F then typing the words you want to find in the article

This statement of Scrooge is a statement of acceptance. He is acknowledging the fact he was an unhappy man that is why he was asking for forgiveness, for redemption. Acknowledging his mistakes and accepting what he was, is really a proof that he has discovered a “new self.” He has succumbed to change and that he was willing to be a better, converted man.
(For external quotations)

According to Tinko, “Charles Dickens’s famous novel about Ebenezer Scrooge changed the celebration of Christmas into what we think of as traditional today: an occasion to give to those less fortunate and to gather family and friends around laden dinner tables and Christmas trees filled with lights, decorations, and toys (Timko).”

*This part is found in the web address that I have put in the references part which is http://www.uuworld.org/ideas/articles/2273.shtml. Just find the quotation, by using the find tool, by pressing CTRL+F then typing the words you want to find in the article.

 

The Christmas Carol really shed a new light into how we perceive Christmas. It showed the harsh reality that not all people have the luxury to enjoy Christmas. There are a lot of things that people like Scrooge can do in order to make a difference, especially for the poor and the needy.

According to Kelly, “The three stages of Scrooge’s conversion–the detailed memories of a lonely childhood, an awakened vision of the suffering and joys of those presently around him, and his fear of future loneliness and an awareness of his own mortality — combine to change him into a decent man, one who goes on to earn from those who knew him this crowning accolade: it was always said of him, that he knew how to keep Christmas well, if any man alive possessed the knowledge (Kelly and Young).”

*This part is found in the web address that I have put in the references part which is http://victorian.lang.nagoya-u.ac.jp/victorianweb/authors/dickens/kelly3.html. Just find the quotation, by using the find tool, by pressing CTRL+F then typing the words you want to find in the article.

 

Scrooge’s conversion was a step-by-step process wherein it started with his previous life, how he lived it, and then followed by how he was living it, and lastly, a reflection of what would be his future life look like. It all reflected Scrooge, so it was up to him if he wanted to change or not. The specters were there only to help him, not to impose it.

According to SparkNotes.com, “An important aspect of A Christmas Carol (which is probably today’s most popular Christmas tale, save for the seminal holiday story of Christ’s birth) is its modern view of Christmas as a joyous holiday rather than as a solemn holy day (“A Christmas Carol”)”.

*This part is found in the web address that I have put in the references part which is http://www.sparknotes.com/lit/christmascarol/section2.rhtml. Just find the quotation, by using the find tool, by pressing CTRL+F then typing the words you want to find in the article.

 

Christmas is such an important celebration for many of us. Dickens’ story gave a new perspective that it’s not only a season of giving and receiving, it is also a reflection of people’s sufferings, and people like Ebenezer Scrooge could make a difference.

According to Perdue, “Of all the affecting scenes from A Christmas Carol none touches the heart more than the death of the crippled Tiny Tim, foreshadowed to Scrooge by the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come, especially to Victorian readers. Large families and child mortality were common in the 19th century and many readers may have suffered firsthand the loss of a child (Perdue).”

*This part is found in the web address that I have put in the references part which is http://www.charlesdickenspage.com/carol.html. Just find the quotation, by using the find tool, by pressing CTRL+F then typing the words you want to find in the article.

This happening is one of the things that affected Ebenezer Scrooge the most. It is very influential and really made a deep impact on the Scrooge, during his process of conversion.

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