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Lab Experiment on Muscles Paper

INSTRUCTIONS NOT FOLLOWED: the experiment should be to identify which hand is a stronger muscle by providing different people on pressing or squeezing the ball for a specific period of time that should be identified and counting how many times can each hand press the ball not by recording the reactions of the people

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Lab Experiment on Muscles

Aim

The aim of this experiment is to examine the stronger hand muscles between the right and the left hands.

Background Information

The hands are used for numerous functions where their functions can be traced back into the womb. The hand buds are formed during the gestational age, week 6 after conception, and appear as webbed structures that later become hands. Apart from the palm and the fingers seen on the exterior, the hands are made of other components, which make them to be as functional as they usually are.

Apart from the bones, the muscles are the most important part of a hand. They enable the hand to grip amongst other functions. Although both hands are able to engage in many activities, most people have a dominating hand. These people are considered to be right-handed or left-handed people. Some work well with both hands. Although the dominance of the hand has been associated by the dominance of the brain hemispheres, the muscles of the hand are very important in the functions of the dominating hand.

The people who use the right hand most tend to have stronger grips and muscles on the right hand as compared to the left hand. This same case applies to the people using the left hand. It is not clear whether the muscles of the handed are constantly strong in one particular hand (e.g. right or left) or they are dependent on the dominating hand. The hand is comprised of two groups of muscles. These are the intrinsic and the extrinsic muscles.

According to Kamen (2001), the intrinsic muscles are made up of the hypothenar and the thenar. The hypothenar is the little finger and the thenar is the thumb. The extrinsic muscles are made up of the extensors and the flexors. The two long flexors of the fingers are at the forearm’s underside. These allow the hand to bend. The back of the forearm accommodates the extensors. They help the hand and the fingers to straighten up. The coordination of these two groups of muscles allows the hand to bend, grip, stretch, amongst other functions.

The contraction and relaxing of these two types of muscles allows the hand to perform its main functions. However, using the same processes, one hand can have a stronger grip than the other hand. There have been observations that there are people whose both hands have the same gripping capacity (Kamen 52). Whether this is voluntary or inbuilt, the experiment will show us whether this happens to particular individuals or to all individuals. Depending on the dominating hand, there are people who tend to react more using one hand. It is significant to identify whether this observation is inbuilt, involuntary or voluntary.

Hypothesis

This experiment is designed to identify whether the strength in the muscles of the hands is the same or whether the right hand muscles are stronger than the left hand muscles. When a person reaches out for something, he/she tends to reach out with one particular hand. If they are asked to point their strongest hand, most people tend to point at a particular hand or even use that hand to do a particular activity in order to demonstrate. It has good to identify the stronger muscle in individuals.

Controlled Variables

Pressing a soft ball

Uncontrolled Variables

The use of the hands

Dependent Variables

The hand muscles (will be found in the participants’ hands).

Independent Variables

Twenty participants will be randomly selected. These participants will be of different heights and weights. These participants are independent as they will be asked to pick the ball without necessary being directed on which hand to pick the ball with and then they will be directed on which hand to pick the ball with.

Materials Required

A soft ball Stopwatches

Procedure

We will select twenty different participants of different heights and weights in the tenth grade biology class The participants will be divided into two groups of ten participants each. A supervisor or a group leader can be assigned to each group. Each group will be asked to let each participant to hold the soft ball for designated time e.g. one minute, without directing them on the hand to use Each group will then be asked to let the participants to hold the same ball using their strong hand for the same period and for a longer period (three minutes). The participants’ reactions should be greatly observed, as they will be analyzed during the experiment analysis section. The data will be collected in terms of the participants’ reactions to the exercise. For example, which hand did the students use in the first exercise? Which hand did they use in the second exercise? If asked when the felt tired most, what did they respond? Were they tired in the first, second or the third exercise?

Work Cited

Kamen, Gary. Foundations of Exercise Science. Mason, OH: Cengage Learning, 2001. Print.

INSTRUCTIONS NOT FOLLOWED: the experiment should be to identify which hand is a stronger muscle by providing different people on pressing or squeezing the ball for a specific period of time that should be identified and counting how many times can each hand press the ball not by recording the reactions of the people

Name:

Course:

Tutor:

Date:

Lab Experiment on Muscles

Aim

The aim of this experiment is to examine the stronger hand muscles between the right and the left hands.

Background Information

The hands are used for numerous functions where their functions can be traced back into the womb. The hand buds are formed during the gestational age, week 6 after conception, and appear as webbed structures that later become hands. Apart from the palm and the fingers seen on the exterior, the hands are made of other components, which make them to be as functional as they usually are.

Apart from the bones, the muscles are the most important part of a hand. They enable the hand to grip amongst other functions. Although both hands are able to engage in many activities, most people have a dominating hand. These people are considered to be right-handed or left-handed people. Some work well with both hands. Although the dominance of the hand has been associated by the dominance of the brain hemispheres, the muscles of the hand are very important in the functions of the dominating hand.

The people who use the right hand most tend to have stronger grips and muscles on the right hand as compared to the left hand. This same case applies to the people using the left hand. It is not clear whether the muscles of the handed are constantly strong in one particular hand (e.g. right or left) or they are dependent on the dominating hand. The hand is comprised of two groups of muscles. These are the intrinsic and the extrinsic muscles.

According to Kamen (2001), the intrinsic muscles are made up of the hypothenar and the thenar. The hypothenar is the little finger and the thenar is the thumb. The extrinsic muscles are made up of the extensors and the flexors. The two long flexors of the fingers are at the forearm’s underside. These allow the hand to bend. The back of the forearm accommodates the extensors. They help the hand and the fingers to straighten up. The coordination of these two groups of muscles allows the hand to bend, grip, stretch, amongst other functions.

The contraction and relaxing of these two types of muscles allows the hand to perform its main functions. However, using the same processes, one hand can have a stronger grip than the other hand. There have been observations that there are people whose both hands have the same gripping capacity (Kamen 52). Whether this is voluntary or inbuilt, the experiment will show us whether this happens to particular individuals or to all individuals. Depending on the dominating hand, there are people who tend to react more using one hand. It is significant to identify whether this observation is inbuilt, involuntary or voluntary.

Hypothesis

This experiment is designed to identify whether the strength in the muscles of the hands is the same or whether the right hand muscles are stronger than the left hand muscles. When a person reaches out for something, he/she tends to reach out with one particular hand. If they are asked to point their strongest hand, most people tend to point at a particular hand or even use that hand to do a particular activity in order to demonstrate. It has good to identify the stronger muscle in individuals.

Controlled Variables

Pressing a soft ball

Uncontrolled Variables

The use of the hands

Dependent Variables

The hand muscles (will be found in the participants’ hands).

Independent Variables

Twenty participants will be randomly selected. These participants will be of different heights and weights. These participants are independent as they will be asked to pick the ball without necessary being directed on which hand to pick the ball with and then they will be directed on which hand to pick the ball with.

Materials Required

A soft ball Stopwatches

Procedure

We will select twenty different participants of different heights and weights in the tenth grade biology class The participants will be divided into two groups of ten participants each. A supervisor or a group leader can be assigned to each group. Each group will be asked to let each participant to hold the soft ball for designated time e.g. one minute, without directing them on the hand to use Each group will then be asked to let the participants to hold the same ball using their strong hand for the same period and for a longer period (three minutes). The participants’ reactions should be greatly observed, as they will be analyzed during the experiment analysis section. The data will be collected in terms of the participants’ reactions to the exercise. For example, which hand did the students use in the first exercise? Which hand did they use in the second exercise? If asked when the felt tired most, what did they respond? Were they tired in the first, second or the third exercise?

Work Cited

Kamen, Gary. Foundations of Exercise Science. Mason, OH: Cengage Learning, 2001. Print.

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