84% NOT ALL RIGHT Unit Test: The Gothic Novel: The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde

Topics: Flashcards
To summarize a text means to succinctly state the

supporting details of the text in the author’s words.
central ideas of the text using the author’s words.
descriptions of the main characters in one’s own words.
central ideas of the text using one’s own word

central ideas of the text using one’s own words.

. . . and the next moment, I had sprung to my feet and leaped back against the wall, my arms raised to shield me from that prodigy, my mind submerged in terror.

“O God!” I screamed, and “O God!” again and again; for there before my eyes—pale and shaken, and half fainting, and groping before him with his hands, like a man restored from death—there stood Henry Jekyll!

This part of Lanyon’s letter helps the reader understand that

Lanyon knew that Hyde killed Jekyll.
Lanyon is now Hyde’s prisoner.
Jekyll is trying to hurt Lanyon.
Jekyll and Hyde are the same person.

Jekyll and Hyde are the same person.

“Well, but since we have touched upon this business, and for the last time I hope,” continued the doctor, “there is one point I should like you to understand. I have really a very great interest in poor Hyde. I know you have seen him; he told me so; and I fear he was rude. But I do sincerely take a great, a very great interest in that young man; and if I am taken away, Utterson, I wish you to promise me that you will bear with him and get his rights for him.

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I think you would, if you knew all; and it would be a weight off my mind if you would promise.”

How does the conflict in this excerpt create suspense?

It makes the reader wonder how Mr. Utterson came to know Dr. Jekyll.
It makes the reader wonder how Mr. Utterson and Dr. Jekyll are connected.
It makes the reader wonder why Dr. Jekyll has such an interest in Hyde.
It makes the reader wonder why Mr. Utterson is suspicious of Mr. Hyde.

It makes the reader wonder why Dr. Jekyll has such an interest in Hyde.

Mr. Utterson the lawyer was a man of a rugged countenance that was never lighted by a smile; cold, scanty and embarrassed in discourse; backward in sentiment; lean, long, dusty, dreary and yet somehow lovable.

Which best explains why this excerpt is part of the plot’s exposition?

It helps to develop the central conflict of the story.
It provides background information about a character.
It hints at what is going to happen to Mr. Utterson.
It describes Mr. Utterson as a man not to be trusted.

It provides background information about a character.

What would be the first step to take in summarizing the excerpt from The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde?

Identify the main events of Lanyon receiving the letter and Lanyon traveling to Hyde’s house to get the drawer.
Identify the details of Hyde’s physical appearance at Lanyon’s house and the contents of the drawer Lanyon retrieves.
Identify the characters of Jekyll, Hyde, and Lanyon and the settings of Hyde’s house and Lanyon’s house.
Identify the details in the letter that was sent to Lanyon and Lanyon’s reaction to the request in the letter.

Identify the characters of Jekyll, Hyde, and Lanyon and the settings of Hyde’s house and Lanyon’s house.

A struggle between opposing forces or characters within a story is known as .
conflict

This last, however, was not so easy of accomplishment; for Mr. Hyde had numbered few familiars—even the master of the servant maid had only seen him twice; his family could nowhere be traced; he had never been photographed; and the few who could describe him differed widely, as common observers will. Only on one point were they agreed; and that was the haunting sense of unexpressed deformity with which the fugitive impressed his beholders.

This excerpt creates suspense by making the reader wonder

how Mr. Hyde had managed to be seen by so few people.
why people who had seen Mr. Hyde could only agree on one point.
when Mr. Hyde would see any of his family members again.
what people would do if they actually got a long look at Mr. Hyde.

how Mr. Hyde had managed to be seen by so few people.

What he told me in the next hour, I cannot bring my mind to set on paper. I saw what I saw, I heard what I heard, and my soul sickened at it; and yet now when that sight has faded from my eyes, I ask myself if I believe it, and I cannot answer. My life is shaken to its roots; sleep has left me; the deadliest terror sits by me at all hours of the day and night; and I feel that my days are numbered, and that I must die; and yet I shall die incredulous. As for the moral turpitude that man unveiled to me, even with tears of penitence, I can not, even in memory, dwell on it without a start of horror.

How does the point of view affect how information is revealed in the excerpt?

The narration directly reveals Lanyon’s feelings.
The readers learn something that Lanyon does not know.
Lanyon’s thoughts are revealed through his actions.
Hyde’s thoughts are revealed through his actions.

The narration directly reveals Lanyon’s feelings.

What is the second step in summarizing plot events?

Identify the main events and details in each part of the plot.
Objectively explain the story in your own words.
Identify the characters and setting presented in the exposition.
Think about the order of events in the section you are summarizing.

Objectively explain the story in your own words.

“You know I never approved of it,” pursued Utterson, ruthlessly disregarding the fresh topic.

“My will? Yes, certainly, I know that,” said the doctor, a trifle sharply. “You have told me so.”

“Well, I tell you so again,” continued the lawyer. “I have been learning something of young Hyde.”

The large handsome face of Dr. Jekyll grew pale to the very lips, and there came a blackness about his eyes. “I do not care to hear more,” said he. “This is a matter I thought we had agreed to drop.”

“What I heard was abominable,” said Utterson.

“It can make no change. You do not understand my position,” returned the doctor, with a certain incoherency of manner. “I am painfully situated, Utterson; my position is a very strange—a very strange one. It is one of those affairs that cannot be mended by talking.”

The conflict in this passage develops the plot by

forcing Dr. Jekyll to fully explain his complicated business relationship with Mr. Hyde to Mr. Utterson.
convincing Mr. Utterson to try and help Mr. Hyde avoid punishment for the crimes he has committed.
prompting Dr. Jekyll to ask Mr. Utterson to promise that Mr. Hyde will receive what is left to him in the will.
creating an argument between Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Utterson that causes Dr. Jekyll to fire his lawyer.

prompting Dr. Jekyll to ask Mr. Utterson to promise that Mr. Hyde will receive what is left to him in the will.

An ivory-faced and silvery-haired old woman opened the door. She had an evil face, smoothed by hypocrisy: but her manners were excellent. Yes, she said, this was Mr. Hyde’s, but he was not at home; he had been in that night very late, but he had gone away again in less than an hour; there was nothing strange in that; his habits were very irregular, and he was often absent; for instance, it was nearly two months since she had seen him till yesterday.

The plot creates by making the reader wonder why Mr. Hyde is away from home for such extended periods of time.

suspense

Which of these are characteristics of third-person limited point of view? Check all that apply.

The reader’s access to information is not limited to any one character.
The narration follows the thoughts and feelings of only one character.
The reader’s access to information is limited to just one character.
The narration follows the thoughts and feelings of all of the characters.
The thoughts and feelings of secondary characters are revealed through their words and actions


x
x

x

Which chart places the elements of plot in the correct order?

Chart A
Chart B
Chart C
Chart D

Chart C

“I can’t pretend that I shall ever like him,” said the lawyer.

“I don’t ask that,” pleaded Jekyll, laying his hand upon the other’s arm; “I only ask for justice; I only ask you to help him for my sake, when I am no longer here.”

Utterson heaved an irrepressible sigh. “Well,” said he, “I promise.”

Which type of conflict is most suggested by the line “Utterson heaved an irrepressible sigh”?

character vs. nature
character vs. society
character vs. self
character vs. character

character vs. self

At this moment, however, the rooms bore every mark of having been recently and hurriedly ransacked; clothes lay about the floor, with their pockets inside out; lock-fast drawers stood open; and on the hearth there lay a pile of grey ashes, as though many papers had been burned. From these embers the inspector disinterred the butt end of a green cheque book, which had resisted the action of the fire; the other half of the stick was found behind the door; and as this clinched his suspicions, the officer declared himself delighted.

How does this excerpt develop the plot?

The condition of the room and its contents cause Mr. Utterson and Inspector Newcomen to plan a trip to the bank in hopes of catching Mr. Hyde.
The condition of the room and its contents cause Mr. Utterson and Newcomen to start investigating someone other than Mr. Hyde.
The condition of the room and its contents cause Mr. Utterson and Inspector Newcomen to consider Mr. Hyde as a murder suspect.
The condition of the room and its contents cause Mr. Utterson and Inspector Newcomen to contact Dr. Jekyll to see if he can provide any answers.

The condition of the room and its contents cause Mr. Utterson and Inspector Newcomen to plan a trip to the bank in hopes of catching Mr. Hyde.

At this moment, however, the rooms bore every mark of having been recently and hurriedly ransacked; clothes lay about the floor, with their pockets inside out; lock-fast drawers stood open; and on the hearth there lay a pile of grey ashes, as though many papers had been burned. From these embers the inspector disinterred the butt end of a green cheque book, which had resisted the action of the fire; the other half of the stick was found behind the door; and as this clinched his suspicions, the officer declared himself delighted.

Where in the plot is this excerpt found?

resolution
falling action
climax
rising action

rising action

1. Inspector Newcomen and Mr. Utterson search Mr. Hyde’s house.
2. An envelope bearing the name and address of Mr. Utterson is found.
3. The other half of the walking stick and a burnt checkbook are discovered.
4. A maid servant witnesses Mr. Hyde murdering a man in the street.
5. Mr. Utterson identifies the body of the man murdered in the street.

Which correctly places these plot events in order?

2, 5, 1, 3, 4
5, 1, 3, 4, 2
4, 2, 5, 1, 3
3, 4, 2, 5, 1

4, 2, 5, 1, 3

Presently her eye wandered to the other, and she was surprised to recognise in him a certain Mr. Hyde, who had once visited her master and for whom she had conceived a dislike. He had in his hand a heavy cane, with which he was trifling; but he answered never a word, and seemed to listen with an ill-contained impatience. And then all of a sudden he broke out in a great flame of anger, stamping with his foot, brandishing the cane, and carrying on (as the maid described it) like a madman. The old gentleman took a step back, with the air of one very much surprised and a trifle hurt; and at that Mr. Hyde broke out of all bounds and clubbed him to the earth. And next moment, with ape-like fury, he was trampling his victim under foot and hailing down a storm of blows, under which the bones were audibly shattered and the body jumped upon the roadway.

How does the conflict in this excerpt advance the plot? Check all that apply.

Carew’s murder provides Mr. Utterson with a reason to search Mr. Hyde’s house and learn more about him.
Mr. Hyde is found hiding in his home when Mr. Utterson and Inspector Newcomen search it.
Mr. Utterson finds evidence on the victim that further ties Mr. Hyde to Dr. Jekyll.
Mr. Utterson begins to dislike Mr. Hyde and becomes suspicious of his connection to Dr. Jekyll.
Inspector Newcomen and Mr. Utterson find items that suggest Mr. Hyde has committed other crimes.

x

x

x

He [Hyde] put the glass to his lips and drank at one gulp. A cry followed; he reeled, staggered, clutched at the table and held on, staring with injected eyes, gasping with open mouth; and as I looked there came, I thought, a change—he seemed to swell—his face became suddenly black and the features seemed to melt and alter—and the next moment, I had sprung to my feet and leaped back against the wall, my arms raised to shield me from that prodigy, my mind submerged in terror.

Which is the best summary of the events described?

Hyde’s face starts to swell, and his features begin to change. He then takes a drink from the glass as Lanyon looks on in terror.
Hyde’s features begin to change drastically. Lanyon watches for a moment before running out of the room in fear.
Hyde drinks from the glass and begins staggering around. Lanyon watches Hyde’s features change and leaps back in horror.
Hyde raises the glass to his lips and drinks all the liquid in one gulp. Immediately after, he starts to convulse and stagger.

Hyde drinks from the glass and begins staggering around. Lanyon watches Hyde’s features change and leaps back in horror.

The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde is told through a third-person point of view.
limited

The author includes Jekyll’s letter within Lanyon’s letter to

mislead the reader with unnecessary information.
add another perspective to the story.
confuse the reader with another point of view.
show that Jekyll is a better writer than Lanyon.

add another perspective to the story.

What must a reader do when summarizing a text? Check all that apply.

use objective language
include all of the supporting details
include the central ideas
use subjective language
include the most important details

x

x

x

Upon the reading of this letter, I made sure my colleague was insane; but till that was proved beyond the possibility of doubt, I felt bound to do as he requested. . . . I rose accordingly from table, got into a hansom, and drove straight to Jekyll’s house. The butler was awaiting my arrival; he had received by the same post as mine a registered letter of instruction, and had sent at once for a locksmith and a carpenter. The tradesmen came while we were yet speaking; and we moved in a body to old Dr. Denman’s surgical theatre, from which . . . Jekyll’s private cabinet is most conveniently entered. The door was very strong, the lock excellent; the carpenter avowed he would have great trouble and have to do much damage, if force were to be used; and the locksmith was near despair. But this last was a handy fellow, and after two hour’s work, the door stood open. . . . I took out the drawer, had it filled up with straw and tied in a sheet, and returned with it to Cavendish Square.

Which is the best summary of the events described?

Before finishing the letter, Lanyon decides to leave to go talk to Jekyll’s butler. Together, they decide to call both a locksmith and a carpenter to help them find where the drawer is in the house.
Lanyon feels pressured to help Jekyll, so he drives to Cavendish Square. He calls a locksmith to help him break into Jekyll’s private cabinet to get the drawer out without harming the contents.
Lanyon calls the butler to arrange for a locksmith to help them get the drawer out of Jekyll’s cabinet. He drives to Jekyll’s house to pick up the drawer and then returns to his home in Cavendish Square.
After reading the letter, Lanyon feels obligated to complete Jekyll’s request, so he drives to Jekyll’s house. With the help of the butler, the locksmith, and the carpenter, Lanyon is able to retrieve the drawer and return home.

After reading the letter, Lanyon feels obligated to complete Jekyll’s request, so he drives to Jekyll’s house. With the help of the butler, the locksmith, and the carpenter, Lanyon is able to retrieve the drawer and return home.

I never saw a circle of such hateful faces; and there was the man in the middle, with a kind of black sneering coolness—frightened too, I could see that—but carrying it off, sir, really like Satan. ‘If you choose to make capital out of this accident,’ said he, ‘I am naturally helpless. No gentleman but wishes to avoid a scene,’ says he. ‘Name your figure.’ Well, we screwed him up to a hundred pounds for the child’s family; he would have clearly liked to stick out; but there was something about the lot of us that meant mischief, and at last he struck.

What type of conflict does the excerpt illustrate?

character vs. self
character vs. character
character vs. society
character vs. nature

character vs. character

The perspective from which a story is told is called the

plot device.
point of view.
main event.
summary of the plot.

point of view.

I hesitated long before I put this theory to the test of practice. I knew well that I risked death; for any drug that so potently controlled and shook the very fortress of identity, might, by the least scruple of an overdose or at the least inopportunity in the moment of exhibition, utterly blot out that immaterial tabernacle which I looked to it to change.

The excerpt is a good example of suspense because it

educates the reader with background information.
tells the reader the inner thoughts of a main character.
amuses the reader with interesting descriptive details.
makes the reader excited about what will happen next.

tells the reader the inner thoughts of a main character.

“My dear Utterson,—When this shall fall into your hands, I shall have disappeared, under what circumstances I have not the penetration to foresee, but my instinct and all the circumstances of my nameless situation tell me that the end is sure and must be early. Go then, and first read the narrative which Lanyon warned me he was to place in your hands; and if you care to hear more, turn to the confession of

“Your unworthy and unhappy friend,

“HENRY JEKYLL.”

Since the letter adds suspense and moves the story forward, the letter can be viewed as

a point of view.
a plot device.
the climax.
the resolution.

a plot device.

Upon the reading of this letter, I made sure my colleague was insane; but till that was proved beyond the possibility of doubt, I felt bound to do as he requested.

In the excerpt, Dr. Lanyon’s conflict is an internal conflict because it is

character vs. character.
character vs. nature.
character vs. self.
character vs. society.

character vs. self.

“You know I never approved of it,” pursued Utterson, ruthlessly disregarding the fresh topic.
“My will? Yes, certainly, I know that,” said the doctor, a trifle sharply. “You have told me so.”

“Well, I tell you so again,” continued the lawyer. “I have been learning something of young Hyde.”

The large handsome face of Dr. Jekyll grew pale to the very lips, and there came a blackness about his eyes. “I do not care to hear more,” said he. “This is a matter I thought we had agreed to drop.”

“What I heard was abominable,” said Utterson.

“It can make no change. You do not understand my position,” returned the doctor, with a certain incoherency of manner.

Which is the most accurate summary of the excerpt?

Dr. Jekyll is annoyed that he has to answer questions about his will.
Mr. Utterson is deeply concerned about the will that he is handling.
Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Utterson argue about Jekyll’s will and Mr. Hyde.
Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Utterson have a conversation about Mr. Hyde.

Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Utterson argue about Jekyll’s will and Mr. Hyde.

To cast in my lot with Jekyll, was to die to those appetites which I had long secretly indulged and had of late begun to pamper. To cast it in with Hyde, was to die to a thousand interests and aspirations, and to become, at a blow and forever, despised and friendless.

The most likely reason the author included this excerpt from Jekyll’s point of view is to

show the reader Jekyll’s thoughts.
describe Hyde’s feelings to the reader.
explain Hyde’s plans to the reader.
make the reader accept Jekyll’s logic.

show the reader Jekyll’s thoughts.

Between these two, I now felt I had to choose. My two natures had memory in common, but all other faculties were most unequally shared between them. Jekyll (who was composite) now with the most sensitive apprehensions, now with a greedy gusto, projected and shared in the pleasures and adventures of Hyde; but Hyde was indifferent to Jekyll, or but remembered him as the mountain bandit remembers the cavern in which he conceals himself from pursuit.

To summarize this excerpt correctly, what is the main event the reader should include?

Jekyll did actually remember some of Hyde’s feelings and actions.
Hyde did not really care about Jekyll and kept him in the background.
Hyde and Jekyll were both parts of Jekyll and shared some memories.
Jekyll had a hard time choosing between being Jekyll and Hyde.

Hyde and Jekyll were both parts of Jekyll and shared some memories.

Mr. Utterson the lawyer was a man of a rugged countenance that was never lighted by a smile; cold, scanty and embarrassed in discourse; backward in sentiment; lean, long, dusty, dreary and yet somehow lovable.

This sentence is part of the exposition because it

introduces a character.
makes the reader curious.
develops the central conflict.
provides tension for the story.

introduces a character.

It was late in the afternoon, when Mr. Utterson found his way to Dr. Jekyll’s door, where he was at once admitted by Poole, and carried down by the kitchen offices and across a yard which had once been a garden, to the building which was indifferently known as the laboratory or dissecting rooms.

This excerpt is part of the plot’s

climax.
exposition.
falling action.
rising action.

rising action.

Cite this page

84% NOT ALL RIGHT Unit Test: The Gothic Novel: The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. (2018, Feb 21). Retrieved from https://paperap.com/paper-on-84-not-all-right-unit-test-the-gothic-novel-the-strange-case-of-dr-jekyll-and-mr-hyde/

84% NOT ALL RIGHT Unit Test: The Gothic Novel: The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde
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