Due to the unexpecting passing of her aunty Patricia has

Due to the unexpecting passing of her aunty, Patricia has been displaying a concerning level of mental and physical emotional distress. Conjointly, due to her not being able to go to her Aunt’s funeral, due to her HSC commitments and her Aunty being in America, she has been experiencing a sense of grief, stress, confusion, unhappiness, and melancholy, to a level she has never had before. Patricia has been essentially making herself more aware of the fact that her loved ones could be taken at any moment.

This is consequently causing her an extreme amount of stress. Patricia not being able to mourn properly has therefore made her becoming more isolated from her own family and friends as a means of trying to deal with her grief; as she felt she could not do it properly. Opposed to the idea of getting advice from her friends and family, Patricia decided to pursue seeking help and guidance from a psychologist. However, Patricia considering psychological intervention does give her an profound amount of apprehension and concern, as she has never been in a situation where she has encountered or experienced something that has led to her needing professional help.

The concept of discussing and trusting someone she doesn’t know, with such a sensitive topic, makes her have uneasiness towards the whole idea of talking to a psychologist. Thus, throughout the information she has given, Patricia requires an approach of psychological intervention that allows for an environment to help create a trusting, open accepting therapeutic relationship between her and the psychologist.

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The most fitting and appropriate structure for a psychological outline of counselling for Patricia would be the person centred approach. According to Dave Mearns and Brian Thorne, ‘person centred counselling’ is a method of therapeutic activity, which essentially is “a relationship between two persons, both of whom are committed to moving towards a greater fullness of being” . This then allows according to Dave Mearns“the development of a relationship between two persons, showing the inner worlds of both client and counsellor are of equal importance in the forging of a relationship that will serve the needs and interests of the client” . The psychological intervention, personal centred approach by Carl Rogers would be the most fitting towards Patricia’s situation. According to Dr Greg Mulhauser, “it allows the client as their own best authority on their own experience, and it views the client as being fully capable of fulfilling their own potential for growth” . According to Dave Mearns, “the implicit aim of person centred counselling is to work help the Patricia to internalise her locus of evaluation. Helping her to internalise her locus of evaluation is not achieved by exercising power over her but by creating a relationship in which the client may take responsibility for herself” . This shows of how psychologist intervention would be best suited for Patricia, as it helps for her to tell her grief and the counselor using that information given to therefore make Patricia figure out how to deal with her grief. In the person centred counselling approach, Rogers maintains three core conditions in providing a climate conducive to growth and therapeutic change. They include unconditional positive regard, empathy, and congruence. These three therapist attributes that Carl Rogers implies you should use to create a growth promoting an environment in which individuals can move forward and become what they are capable of becoming, is a perfect way of helping Patricia deal with her would be a perfect way of deal with her issue of grief. Using the first of the three core conditions, unconditional positive regard allows the counsellor to accept the client unconditionally and non-judgmentally, this therefore can allow for Patricia to freely explore her thoughts and feelings, being positive or negative, without the fear of rejection or condemnation of the councillor. The second of the three core conditions, empathy, allows for the counsellor to accurately understand the client’s thoughts, feelings and meanings from the client’s own perspective. Again, this can really help the counsellor perceive Patricia’s point of view. Empathy can demonstrate that not only does her view have value, but it shows that she is also being accepted. The third of the three core conditions, congruence, allows for the counsellor to be authentic and genuine. Congruence allows for the counsellor not to present a facade, but to be transparent and present to Patricia. The person centred counselling approach thereby can enable Patricia to therefore create a deeper bond and personal relationship with her counsellor. This therefore allows for her to open up more and to become comfortable talk about her grief about her aunty. Therefore it helps her to start developing and allowing for Patricia to grow in her own way towards her dealing with pain towards her aunt’s death.

A micro-skill that would be most relevant and appropriate for a counsellor dealing with Patricia’s grief would be active listening. Microskills are the basic foundational tools to create the necessary conditions in which positive change can take place. According to Useful Counselling Microskills,“Active listening allows for the counsellor to carefully listen to what is being said, to help the counsellor join empathically with the client and to encourage the client to continue talking. Active listening includes non – verbal responses, encouragers, accenting and amplifying, reflection of content and feelings, matching the young person’s language, summarising and noticing what is missing” . According to Carl Rogers and Richard E. Farson,“clinical and research evidence clearly shows that sensitive listening is a most effective agent for individual personality change and group development” . This micro skill would be really impactful towards Patricia dealing with her grief because active listening, enables communication effectively and is an important requirement in any type of therapeutic counselling work. According to Kathryn J Robertson, they are an “extension of generic communication skills and involve both verbal and nonverbal communication. Real active listening requires the listener to avoid common responses when listening. In other circumstances many of these responses may be appropriate, but when performing active listening, these are commonly called ‘roadblocks’. ” This microskill does not allows for there to be any roadblocks, as active listening allows for the counsellor to convey what Patricia is saying. The counsellor through the microskill active listening, allows for Patricia to give her story of what happened. The counsellor does this to get a clear picture about what she wants help with. Active listening allows for the counsellor to help comprehend what Patricia is saying, listening to actively analyse what she is saying without any distractions. It also allows for retaining, which requires the counsellor to remember what Patricia is saying to allow for her message to be conveyed. Active listening again, allows for responding afterwards, both verbal and nonverbal feedback to Patricia, to make sure that the counsellor and her are both hearing and understanding what Patricia is saying. During active listening, Patricia must feel heard, validated and to be comfortable in the environment she is telling her issues about. Throughout non – verbal cues, such as head nods, smiles, eye contact and leaning forward towards Patricia, it allows for her to know that the counsellor is listening and understanding what she putting out there. This therefore makes her know that she is being understood, which can allow her to feel that she can expand more on how she is feeling. Verbal cues such as, I see, tell me more, again allow for Patricia feel that she is being heard by her counselling and that they are interested in what she is saying.

To conclude, the psychological model that would be most relevant and appropriate for Patricia would be the person centred approach. Through the unexpecting death of her aunty, she has faced and experienced a sense of grief, stress, confusion, unhappiness and melancholy. Throughout the person centred therapy, Patricia is able to develop, according to Dave Mearns and Brian Thorne a “relationship between two persons, and shows the inner worlds of both the client and counsellor forging a relationship that will serve the needs and interests of the client”. This psychologist intervention is best suited for her, as it allows for Rogers three core conditions in providing a climate conducive to growth and therapeutic change. Throughout unconditional positive regard, empathy and congruence, it creates a growth promoting environment, which allows for Patricia to move forward and become what she is capable of becoming. Likewise, the micro skill that was suited most and was appropriate for dealing with Patricia’s grief is active listening. Active listening enables communication effectively and allows for the counsellor to comprehend what she is saying to allow for her to know that she is being understood and feel comfortable in the environment she is in. That therefore allows for her to create herself a deeper bond and personal relationship so that the counsellor is able to understand her grief towards her aunt’s death. Throughout the person centred approach and active listening, those two factors can undeniably help Patricia towards her emotional distress towards her aunt’s death.

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Due to the unexpecting passing of her aunty Patricia has. (2019, Dec 14). Retrieved from http://paperap.com/due-to-the-unexpecting-passing-of-her-aunty-patricia-has-best-essay/

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