Animal Rights and Animal Cruelty in Confession of a Bird Watcher and In the Grass by Deniord

While human life is the main priority of the general public, millions across the world value the lives of animals equally and fight daily for their protection. Deniord dives deep into animal rights, writing two pieces describing the gruesome deaths of innocent animals. Confession of a Bird Watcher, a depiction of a bird watcher’s daily horror show, demonstrates the bystander’s constant guilt, and how human industrialization is killing negligent birds. Whereas In the Grass portrays the witness intervening to attempt to save the animals from human slaughter.

Through each piece Deniord proves his pro-animal messages, interestingly however each poem utilizes radically different methods in their actions. Within each piece, Deniord gruesomely illustrates the killings, thus showing the harsh reality of human treatment towards animals. Deniord states in Confession of a Bird Watcher, “The windows are dressed in feathers where the birds have flown against them, then fallen below into the flowers where their bodies lie grounded, still, slowly disappearing each day until all that is left are their narrow, prehensile bones.

” Through these lines he paints a horrific picture of the fallen birds, who so helplessly fell victim to human traps. Furthermore, Deniord writes in In the grass, “Oh, what a mess they were with their heads snapped back and wings unhinged.”

These lines allow Deniord to connect with his audience, showing them the truth of how these animals cease to live. He makes the audience’s mood guilty, sympathizing with the birdwatcher, feeling equal guilt for our windows and man-made creations harming animals each day.

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While using the gruesome images and describe the killings to the audience, Deniord also writes in the first person, allowing the reader to be placed directly into the story, feeling equally as guilty as the characters. For example, he writes in Confession of a Bird Watcher, “I have sat at my window now for yard and watched a hundred birds mistake the glass for air and break their necks, wondering what to do, how else to live among them and keep my view.” Primarily Deniord transports you directly into the piece while describing sitting at the window. He allows the reader to vividly imagine the countless birds running into the window day after day. Thus, his statement of hundreds of birds does not feel exaggerated at all. In your head, you can truly see the morbid pile of birds underneath the window sill.

On the same token Deniord describes through In the Grass, how the character picks up to slaughter chickens, and within the simile, places “I” as who collects them, figurative forcing the audience to pick up the chickens ourselves. While both pieces pursue the same goal, each takes on a different method of persuasion, to get Deniord’ point across. In order to enhance his audience connection, Deniord utilizes similes throughout In the Grass, making the piece even more heart-wrenching. For example the character describes the chicken carcasses as “I picked up the bodies like bloody socks…” Creating a vivid image in the reader’s mind, possible suspending the next time they order a chicken sandwich. It is through these short rhetoric devices that Deniord can convince the audience of his point, and truly show the horrors he sees through these slaughters. Furthermore, in Confession of a Bird Watcher, Deniord creates a long dialog between the home owner and past birds, nothing like any of the techniques used throughout, In the Grass. Through a quote, which takes up the majority of the piece, the character issues an apology to the birds, not only for his own partaking in their deaths, but also for “my generous” or humans as a as guilty as the characters. For example, he writes in Confession of a Bird Watcher, “I have sat at my window now for yard and watched a hundred birds mistake the glass for air and break their necks, wondering what to do, how else to live among them and keep my view.” Primarily Deniord transports you directly into the piece while describing sitting at the window.

He allows the reader to vividly imagine the countless birds running into the window day after day. Thus, his statement of hundreds of birds does not feel exaggerated at all. In your head, you can truly see the morbid pile of birds underneath the window sill. On the same token Deniord describes through In the Grass, how the character picks up to slaughter chickens, and within the simile, places “I” as who collects them, figurative forcing the audience to pick up the chickens ourselves. While both pieces pursue the same goal, each takes on a different method of persuasion, to get Deniord’ point across. In order to enhance his audience connection, Deniord utilizes similes throughout In the Grass, making the piece even more heart-wrenching. For example the character describes the chicken carcasses as “I picked up the bodies like bloody socks…” Creating a vivid image in the reader’s mind, possible suspending the next time they order a chicken sandwich. It is through these short rhetoric devices that Deniord can convince the audience of his point, and truly show the horrors he sees through these slaughters.

Furthermore, in Confession of a Bird Watcher, Deniord creates a long dialog between the home owner and past birds, nothing like any of the techniques used throughout, In the Grass. Through a quote, which takes up the majority of the piece, the character issues an apology to the birds, not only for his own partaking in their deaths, but also for “my generous” or humans as a Throughout each piece Deniord is able to excellently persuade his point of animal treatment, and the horrid actions of humans, both direct and indirect, that lead to the deaths of innocent animals daily. Utilizing a variety of strategies ranging for rhetoric similes and personification to first person perspectives, each poem demonstrates his beliefs. Confession of a Bird Watcher, is a very relatable piece for those who feel guilt for animal cruelty, but do not know the correct steps in helping them. Whereas, In the Grass, differs and takes a hands-on approach and literally attempts to stop the slaughter, and even picked up the dead animals, rather than the depressed watcher who allows them to pile up.

 

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Animal Rights and Animal Cruelty in Confession of a Bird Watcher and In the Grass by Deniord. (2022, Jul 24). Retrieved from https://paperap.com/animal-rights-and-animal-cruelty-in-confession-of-a-bird-watcher-and-in-the-grass-by-deniord/

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